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More than 70 percent of college students in the U.S. attend public institutions, but just how public they remain is changing without much debate. 

"An Era of Neglect: How public colleges were crowded out, beaten up, and failed to fight back” tells the story through six people in the trenches. 

Take a look at a fantastic interactive piece from The Chronicle's Beth McMurtrie.

And join our Google Hangout with Beth and oral history experts Mary Marshall Clark and Clifford Kuhn today (January 29) at 2pm: http://chronicle.com/article/The-Belfast-Projects-Lessons/144249/

Students from St. Anne’s Community College, in Killaloe, County Clare, performed the Kincora call, a medieval war cry. They were kicking off a yearlong program of events dedicated to Brian Boru, a 10th-century Irish king, at Trinity College Dublin. (Niall Carson, PA Wire, AP Images)
See more from the past week in higher education here.

Students from St. Anne’s Community College, in Killaloe, County Clare, performed the Kincora call, a medieval war cry. They were kicking off a yearlong program of events dedicated to Brian Boru, a 10th-century Irish king, at Trinity College Dublin. (Niall Carson, PA Wire, AP Images)

See more from the past week in higher education here.

The latest from The Chronicle Review.

Jean McGarry is chair of the Writing Seminar at Johns Hopkins. Her program is the first to opt in to the new plan to pay bigger stipends to fewer graduate students. (Matt Roth for The Chronicle)

Jean McGarry is chair of the Writing Seminar at Johns Hopkins. Her program is the first to opt in to the new plan to pay bigger stipends to fewer graduate students. (Matt Roth for The Chronicle)

Fifty-two scientists and other passengers who were stranded for more than a week aboard an icebound Russian ship off Antarctica were evacuated last week by a Chinese helicopter to an Australian icebreaker. The planned research trip, called the Australasian Antarctic Expedition, was intended to study how East Antarctica has changed over the last century. (Andrew Peacock, AustralasianAntarcticExpedition)

Fifty-two scientists and other passengers who were stranded for more than a week aboard an icebound Russian ship off Antarctica were evacuated last week by a Chinese helicopter to an Australian icebreaker. The planned research trip, called the Australasian Antarctic Expedition, was intended to study how East Antarctica has changed over the last century. (Andrew Peacock, AustralasianAntarcticExpedition)

Happy New Year, everyone!  To ring in 2014, have a look at The Chronicle’s latest installment from Adjunct Voices.  This video, from Greg Kahn, tells the story of Desiree Robertson, a mother, part-time adjunct professor, and full-time manager at a nonprofit group, who often feels on the verge of losing control. It’s “like those circus acts where you have the plates,” she says, “and then you’re on the ball or on the tricycle, and I think at any moment something’s going to fall.”

Beautiful work the past couple weeks from photographers David Zentz (top left), Mark Abramson (top right), and Lexey Swall (bottom).

The related stories were about the heavy demands on department chairs (top two photos of Jackie Stallcup (left), chair of the English Department at California State U. at Northridge, and Dominick Pinto, chair of the Department of Computer Science and Information Technology at Sacred Heart U.); and a look at accreditors who now find themselves under critical review. 

The most recent covers of The Chronicle Review.  See the cover stories here and here.

Explore The Chronicle’s interactive The Science of Hatred

What makes humans capable of horrific violence? Why do we deny atrocities in the face of overwhelming evidence? A small group of psychologists say they are moving toward answers. Is anyone listening?

By Tom Bartlett, with photos by Tarik Samarah and Matt Lutton